Mitt Romney: Runaway Jane Austen Character

Did you fear I would never address the Obama/Romney election on this blog? Fear no more! The day of reckoning is here, and my ranting powers are at their full potential.

After all, it’s election time in the USA! Will we manage to survive yet another racist-ass, anti-woman, queerphobic disaster of a Republican Candidate (Mitt Romney) and elect a moderately conservative dude instead (Barack Obama)? Only time will tell!

Is Mitt Romney as horrible a slimeball as he appears? … YES!

Now, I know you don’t need me to tell you that Romney is a slimeball. And I know you don’t need me to tell you that he’s a racist, queerphobic, classist misogynist with big entitlement issues. Those things are pretty damn obvious.

kurt chris colfer duh gif

But there IS something I have to tell you. Hell, I put my entire blog schedule on hold for this huge insight into the character of Mitt Romney. It’s GAME CHANGING.

You should probably hold onto something.

Or sit down.

Mitt Romney…

Is a runaway Jane Austen character.

Mr. Collins waving GIF

Remember Mr. Collins?

MIND.

BLOWN.

RIGHT?

Oh yeah, I just brought in Jane Austen.

I… I think I just lost half my readership there. SORRY GUYS! I LOVE YOU! I PROMISE I’LL STOP TALKING ABOUT REGENCY  LITERATURE IN MY NEXT POST. I’LL STOP MAKING VERY BIZARRE SPECULATIONS! COME BAAAAACK.

Then again, the three literature/poli-sci geeks in the room just started fist-pumping. “Austen – Romney FTW!”

And as I am a literature/poli-sci geek… well.

So. Random fact:  I am totally obsessed with Jane Austen. I became an English literature student because of Jane Austen. I’ve read every novel Jane Austen ever published. I’ve read Jane Austen’s juvenilia. I’ve taken classes on Jane Austen. I’ve planned book-length projects on Jane Austen. I think about Jane Austen a LOT.

Jane Austen Cassandra Austen sketch

Jane Austen, on the other hand, does not think about me at all. *sigh*

And a couple weeks ago, I was walking to the library, thinking about Jane Austen (as you do), and how interesting it is that her marriage plot, which appears so stuffy to modern readers, was actually radical and revolutionary, because she gave her female characters the right to say “No” to marriage proposals. And isn’t it interesting how this “no” always shocked male suitors? The entire thing really exposes the way the clueless male suitors felt so damn entitled to getting women… wait… you know who else seems to have that massive sense of entitlement to getting people’s support?

Mitt Romney.

And I was all “OH MY GOD, I’VE GOT IT.”

Mitt Romney is the clueless suitor.

I immediately raced to twitter. “Romney,” I said. “Is like every boorish male suitor in Austen’s novels – Mr. Elton, Mr. Collins, Henry Crawford. The suitor asks the protagonist to marry him, and is shocked she could say “no, because, after all, they have MONEY. Just like Mitt Romney runs for president, and is shocked that people won’t vote for him, because after all, he has MONEY.”

I spent the rest of the day tweeting about this. People needed to know. They needed to know that Mitt Romney is a runaway Jane Austen character.

Now, I imagine you aren’t convinced by my brilliant thesis yet. Neither was I, at first. But the evidence kept piling up.

Let’s have a checklist!

1. The Longing Gaze

Jane Austen’s clueless suitors are known for gazing longingly at their object of their affection. In fact, Mr. Darcy’s longing stares at  Elizabeth Bennet are so epic, they’ve given rise to the term “Firthing” (longing, silent stares) in honor of Colin Firth, the actor who portrayed Mr. Darcy in the BBC version of Pride and Prejudice.

Mr. Darcy, Colin Firth, Firthing.

“Firthing”: I will gaze creepily at you while never bothering to talk to you.

And Mr. Mittens Romney, Clueless Presidential Suitor?

ALSO known for his (vaguely disturbing) longing stares!

Mitt Romney longing gaze John McCain

“Oh, John McCain… will you ever return my affections?’

2. Sense of Entitlement

Austen’s Clueless Suitors are always shocked that the objects of their affection actually expect them to behave WELL. Notable in the Mr. Collins proposal scene, where Mr. Collins is all “what are you talking about with your “no thank you”? I have everything a woman needs!” Or, in Mansfield Park, Henry Crawford’s total confusion at the fact that Fanny doesn’t love him: “Sure, I behaved like a total manipulative douchebag for the past two hundred pages. But I’m hot! And thus entitled to your affections!”

Or the Mr. Darcy proposal scene, where Mr. Darcy finds it incredible that Elizabeth Bennet expects him not to act like an asshole. Yo, I’m already asking you to marry me, Lady. And now you want me to act like a decent human being?

Mr. Darcy proposal GIF OMG I can't Even

“I asked you to marry me, aren’t you just supposed to say “YES?”

Next thing you know, these pesky women will expect you to treat them like human beings!

The suitors, in other words, are very entitled.

And Mitt Romney has a very similar sense of douchebag entitlement.

“What, you mean campaigns involve work? And scrutiny? and QUESTIONS? Yo, I’m being nice enough to run, let’s not raise expectations too high, okay?”

Mitt ROmney confused

“Wait, I specifically told you not to ask me what my political positions are. That’s BASIC COURTESY, MEDIA.”

The poor man gets increasingly annoyed every time voters or the media dare to presume to ask basic questions, like “where are your tax returns?” or “can we get a press conference over here?” or “would you mind clarifying your position, please?” He seems to expect that we should just go along with his whole “don’t look at my record! Don’t look at my business record! Just look at the parts I want you to look at, and only as long as I want you to look at them!” schtick.

Note Ann Romney’s infamous quote on the subject of Mitt Romney’s invisible tax returns:

“We’ve given you people all you need to know!”

Ann Romney We've given you people all you need to know

Entitlement?

Check!

3. Hating Poor People

Jane Austen’s clueless suitors tend to also be giant snobs who highly dislike anyone in a lower class.

Example: Mr. Darcy, to Elizabeth Bennet, the woman he’s proposing marriage to: “Could you expect me to rejoice in the inferiority of your connections? To congratulate myself on the hope of relations, whose condition in life is so decidedly beneath my own?”

Mr. Darcy snob OMG so many peasants
And then we have the fabulous Mr. Mittens Romney! Mr. Romney, do tell us how you feel about poor people in the United States!

“There are 47 percent [of Americans] who are dependent upon government, who believe that they are victims, who believe that government has a responsibility to care for them, who believe that they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you name it. (…) My job is not to worry about those people. I’ll never convince them they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.”

Mitt Romney mother jones video personal responsibility 47%

… I can’t even.

Or, translated into Austen speech:

Mr. Romney, courting the American vote: “”Could you expect me to rejoice in the inferiority of 47% of the country? To congratulate myself on the entitlement of Americans, whose conditions in life are so decidedly beneath my own?”

SEE THE SIMILARITIES?

Mitt ROmney I'm not concerned about the very poor

Check!

4. Acting like people are lucky to be able to vote for/marry them?

Going along with the “sense of entitlement” thing: Austenian suitors usually act like the women they propose to are LUCKY to have someone so handsome/rich/competent asking for their hand in marriage.

Mr. Collins to Elizabeth Bennet, asking her to marry him:  “It does not appear to me that my hand is unworthy your acceptance, or that the establishment I can offer would be any other than highly desirable. My situation in life, my connections with the family of De Bourgh, and my relationship to your own, are circumstances highly in its favor; and you should take it into farther consideration that in spite of your manifold attractions, it is by no means certain that another offer of marriage may ever be made you.”

mr. Collins pride and prejudice proposal scene movie

TL;DR: You are SOOOO lucky I want to marry you.

And Mr. Mitt Romney? Does he ever show any of this “you people are so lucky I want to be President” attitude?

Surely not! That would be too ridiculous! And entitled and…

Ann Romney: “It is time for all Americans to realize how significant this election is and how lucky we are to have someone with Mitt’s qualifications and experience and know-how to be able to have the opportunity to run this country.”

Mulan matchmaker GIF

… wow.

WOW.

(uh, HUGE CHECK) 3

5. Last, but not least: Super Awkward!

Indeed, Jane Austen’s clueless suitors tend to be catastrophically awkward and stiff (which makes them all the more hilarious).

Mr. Collins, as unstudied an air as possible.

SUPER AWKWARD!

Mr. Collins waving GIF

Mr. Romney, what sayeth you to this? Are you stiff and awkward?

Well, he loves laughter. So much.

And he’s so genuine.

… Your honor, I rest my case.

Legally Blonde courtroom scene

I REST. MY CASE.

… I’m telling you. It shocked me too, but it is TRUE. Mitt Romney is a clueless suitor. He has escaped from one of Austen’s novels to our world, and is now plotting his evil evil ways.

As Dani Alexis (@danialexis) reminded me on twitter: “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a Presidency.”

Romney angry speech

Romney: “In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My desire to be President will not be repressed.” (credit for quote: @danialexis)

HIS DESIRE TO BE PRESIDENT WILL NOT BE REPRESSED!

… quite a scary concept, actually.

You know what else? If Mitt Romney is actually a Jane Austen character (which I believe I’ve thoroughly proved by this point), it also explains why Mitt Romney has so many problems with women!

Yes, indeed! For, as Mr. Collins tells us: “As I must therefore conclude that you are not serious in your rejection of me, I shall chuse to attribute it to your wish of increasing my love by suspense, according to the usual practice of elegant females.”

You see, women don’t have a problem with Mitt Romney because he’s from a party of giant misogynists who want to take us back to the stone ages. No! We’re just PRETENDING we’ve not going to vote for him, in order to increase his love by suspense, according to the usual practice of elegant females.

I JUST EXPLAINED THE GENDER GAP EVERYONE!

Cher clueless pushing guy EW

ELEGANT! FEMALE!

[She really loves him, she's just increasing his suspense]

So basically, we need Mittens Romney to ask women to vote for him a few more times, and we’ll totally change our minds!

Clueless Cher GIF Alicia Silverstone

… yeah, no.

I mean, I don’t want to make assumptions about anyone else’s political decisions, but… let’s just say I don’t think Mr. Romney’s “courtship” of my vote is going to end any better for him than Mr. Collins’ courtship of Lizzie Bennet’s hand.

Hey, Mittens, sorry, but I’m sending my absentee ballot off to the states just as soon as I find an American witness to… witness me voting.

And the name I checked?

Not Yours.

But hey, good luck with your attempt to court all us elegant females!

And all you elegant females? And males? Be forewarned! Mitt Romney’s desire to be President will not be suppressed! He’s going to be courting you pretty hard!

And as a runaway Jane Austen character, I think there’s a good chance he’ll start organizing formal balls.

Be.

Prepared.

Mr. Collins dancing GIF

Mr. Collins Style!

Mitt Romney Style!

*Many many thanks to Dani Alexis (@danialexis) and Celeloriel (@celeloriel) on twitter for putting up with my Austen/Romney ramblings, and for playing along and generally being awesome and brilliant.

** Before you ask, yes, I am aware that Mitt Romney is PROBABLY not a Jane Austen character. It’s a joke! I know it’s a joke! Moving on.


7 Comments on “Mitt Romney: Runaway Jane Austen Character”

  1. Myriad says:

    This is so fantastic I don’t even know what to do with myself.

  2. irishup says:

    YES!!!! More evidence (as if any were needed):

    I actually posted this @ SV a couple of weeks ago about Mitt’s coached zingers.
    From Melissa’s piece (quoted from source):

    “…Mr. Romney’s team has concluded that debates are about creating moments and has equipped him with a series of zingers that he has memorized and has been practicing on aides since August.”

    From P&P

    “You judge very properly,” said Mr. Bennet, “and it is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask whether these pleasing
    attentions proceed from the impulse of the moment, or are the result of previous study?”

    “They arise chiefly from what is passing at the time, and though I sometimes amuse myself with suggesting and arranging such little elegant compliments as may
    be adapted to ordinary occasions, I always wish to give them as unstudied an air as possible.”

  3. Lindsay says:

    This is hilarious.

    My previous mental image for Romney had been Loki in this summer’s “The Avengers,” when he makes his first big public appearance on Earth and is surprised when everyone does not spontaneously accept him as their god-king. This is a lot nearer the mark, though.

  4. DouglasG says:

    A beautiful piece, though I think substituting Mr Elton (and his indignant complaint about how he’d received encouragement from Miss Woodhouse) for Mr Crawford would have strengthened both the Case Serious and the Case Humourous. Negative assessments of Henry Crawford without a comparison to Edmund Bertram’s performance in the same line feel incomplete, and Edmund wouldn’t fit here.

    Your friend’s tweet was clever, and I shouldn’t mind so much if it were true, given the current requirement that he be a married man (and to a woman at that).

  5. Heather says:

    This is so wonderful. I am also a Jane Austen fan.

  6. Shawano says:

    Pride and Prejudice is my all time favorite movie, the Colin Firth version in particular. I always referred to it as the A&E version. Did they get it from the BBC?


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