Right-Before-The-Deadline-Hugo-Nominations

[okay, apparently wordpress published this post… and then unpublished it. I don’t even know. If you’re getting an update twice, let me know?] 

Oh, hi everyone! Enjoying the beginning of March? (SNOW, URGH, PLEASE STOP)

Hey, what day are we? The tenth?

Why does that sound ominous?

OH CLAUDE, THE HUGO NOMINATIONS ARE DUE MARCH 10TH! TODAY! TODAY! TODAY!

Now would be a good time to panic!

MAYDAY! MAYDAY! MAYDAY!

I meant to put my recommendations up, oh… weeks before? But I’ve been having blog troubles (and real life troubles, which tend to lead to blog troubles), so you’re getting these much later than I would like. But hey, if you’re seeing this post, it means I managed to get my nominations written up before the deadline!

At this point, that’s a pretty major victory for me.

(we’re just going to forget the fact that it’s FOURTEEN HOURS before the deadline, okay? MAJOR VICTORY OVER DEPRESSION = forgetting how close the call was)

So! First things first! If you have no idea what these bloody awards are, let me explain!
The Hugo are arguably the most prestigious speculative fiction awards in the world. Sure, it says “Science Fiction Awards” on the tin, but let’s face it, these awards are as much for Fantasy as they are for SF, or authors like Neil Gaiman, NK Jemisin and Catherynne Valente would never be nominated.

(I do think it’s harder for fantasy material to win the Hugos, but that’s another post).

Here’s the crucial bit: the Hugos are a fan award, which means that Random Fans can, in theory, influence the process.

… Hey! Are you a fan? Do you care about awards? Do you complain about nominations for days after they’ve been announced? Consider voting (and nominating for the Hugos)! More voters = better.

Details! Important details! You need to be a member of WorldCon to nominate and vote . And the way you become a member is by paying $60.

No joke, $60 is a pretty hefty sum for the privilege of voting. At least it is for me, your friendly neighborhood feminist batwoman student blogger. There are, however, some benefits that offset the cost. As a Hugo Voter, you get the voting packet, which contains almost all the novels, short stories, novellas, movies, shows, fanzines etc. nominated for the Hugo awards. It would cost you a shitload more than $60 to get all those books/movies/novellas etc. on your own.

Another fun fact! If you buy a membership for a WorldCon, you get to nominate for the next year’s Hugos. I was a member of last year’s WorldCon (ChiCon), so I get to nominate this year, even though I haven’t bought a membership for 2013 yet.

Reminder to any fellow ChiCon members: if you paid to nominate/vote last year, or if you paid to go to ChiCon, YOU CAN NOMINATE THIS YEAR. You can’t vote without a new membership, but you can nominate. So nominate! In the next fourteen hours! Because you only have until 11:59 EST.

For everyone else – it’s too late to sign up to nominate, but if you are interested in voting this year, there’s more information on how to sign up here.

Okay! Now, without further ado, the fun part: MY super-last-minute nominations for the Hugos.

(note: not all categories are filled out, because I am just one woman, and I have not read/watched everything in the SF/F field. I’ve tried to restrict my recommendations to fields that I actually know something about).

Novel: 

1. The Killing Moon by NK Jemisin

At first, I thought I only had one nominee in the novel category because I just hadn’t read enough 2012 books. But looking back over my reading log… nope. I actually have read quite a few 2012 books. I just haven’t been impressed by very many of them (oh, BURN) (sorry, China Mielville and Elizabeth Bear. Better luck next time!)

There was one (okay, two) notable exception.

NK Jemisin’s The Killing Moon, and the sequel, The Shadowed Sun.

The Killing Moon NK Jemisin

Honestly, if NK Jemisin’s The Killing Moon doesn’t make it onto the ballot, I will side-eye fandom forever. For my money (if I had any money), it’s not only the best book Jemisin’s ever written, it’s the best novel published in SF/F last year. Jemisin’s worldbuilding and magical systems have never been better. And the plot. GAAAAH, THE PLOT.

A digression here: I think there’s a big difference between a book that should win the Hugo, and a book that CAN win the Hugo. Two years ago, I thought that Feed (Mira Grant) and The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (NK Jemisin) SHOULD have won the Hugo over Blackout/All Clear. But I didn’t think The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms COULD win the Hugo (too much sex! Plus, politics).
Moreover, a someone fairly engaged in social justice, I’m always interested in seeing books nominated that deconstruct, or challenge the more conservative aspects of the SF/F genre. At the same time, I recognize that those books aren’t likely to win, precisely BECAUSE they challenge conservative (and popular) aspects of the genre.

The point of the digression? I think The Killing Moon is one of those rare books that both SHOULD and COULD win the Hugo Award for best novel.

Whenever I think about The Killing Moon, I keep coming back to one word: tight. The plot is tight. The worldbuilding is tight. The characters are tight. The prose is tight. Everything is crafted with such skill that I think the more challenging aspects of the book can just – slide by, unnoticed. Jemisin’s first book, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms was a much more obvious confrontation and reconstruction of the epic fantasy genre, which is why I think it was so controversial. Don’t get me wrong – Jemisin’s Dreamblood books are just as engaged in challenging the epic fantasy genre. But it’s – quieter. The progressive politics of The Killing Moon can probably slide by more conservative voters in a way the politics of The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms could not.

It’s sneakily political.

The second book in the duology, The Shadowed Sun was also published in 2012 (and I also loved it), but NK Jemisin specifically asked that fans nominate The Killing Moon (so her books aren’t in competition with one another), and I’m following her wishes.

I would also be very interested in seeing Catherynne Valente’s The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There and/or Frances Hardinge’s A Face Like Glass on the nomination ballot. I have not read either book, although I enjoy both authors and I’ve heard good things from people I trust about these particular works.

I’d like to see one of them on the ballot because they’re young adult fantasy novels written by women. While young adult novels occasionally make it onto the ballot (and win), it’s my impression that those Chosen Few tend to be by men (e.g. Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book). Again, this is just a theory, but I think there’s a tendency to assume that young adult novels written by men can still be Serious Literature, while young adult novels written by women cannot, even if those women have written Serious Literature in the past.

Thus, I would not be surprised if China Mielville’s foray into YA, Railsea, made it onto the ballot, but I think Valente or Hardinge’s novel would be far more interesting choices.

Best Fan Writer:

Wait, that’s not the category after Best Novel!

…Except for me. Because Best Fan Writer is the category I care about the most.  I love cultural criticism. YOU MAY HAVE NOTICED… since I started an entire blog for just that purpose.

Best Fan Writer is also a category that I’ve found drearily boring in past years – the same writers are usually nominated year after year after year. And, to the surprise of no one, the nominations tends to be dominated by white men (it’s been six years since the final ballot included more than one woman).

Point being: there are tons of brilliant, diverse, interesting writers talking about SF/F. More of them should be recognized.

1. Foz Meadows.

I want to be Foz Meadows when my blog grows up. Her work on racism, sexism, and other forms of oppression in SF/F is unparalleled. She’s articulate, passionate, and thorough: her arguments are brilliant, her research is impecable.

Oh, and she’s extraordinarily entertaining.

Examples: PSA: Your Default Narrative Settings Are Not Apolitical, Politics, YA and Narrative, Racism, Revealing Eden and STGRB, Rape Culture in Gaming

2. Mark Oshiro of MarkReads and MarkWatches

When someone suggested Mark Oshiro for this category, I went “Oh duh, why didn’t I think of him?”

How do you even describe Mark? He’s been reading – and watching – lots of the most important shows and books in SF/F for his two sites, MarkReads and MarkWatches. His reviews are simultaneously insightful and hilarious. He’s perpetually unprepared for plot twists, and perpetually prepared to fall madly in love with new books.

You have not lived until you’ve read – or watched – a Mark Oshiro review.

I can’t tell you how much I love him. He just brings such JOY to his work (while also calling out problematic shit!)

It’s a rare writer who can critique a genre while simultaneously reminding you of why you’re in love with it.

Examples: Mark Reads Revealing Eden (if you want to see Mark dying over terrible writing and racism), Mark Watches Doctor Who: The Angels Take Manhattan, Mark Watches The Legend of Korra: The Revelation, Mark Reads Wild Magic Chapter 3

3. Ana Mardoll of Ana Mardoll’s Ramblings

Ana Mardoll’s website is filled with smart, thorough deconstructions of important genre books – Twilight, the Narnia Books, Buffy, The Hunger Games etc. Her coverage of disability in SF/F is particularly interesting. Like Mark Oshiro, she’s incredibly thorough with her analysis – her deconstructions often go chapter by chapter, and each post can go well over 2000 words.

I suspect she’s overlooked by the SF/F community because she doesn’t fit our model of a fan writer – she’s a feminist/social justice blogger who writes about genre fiction a lot. And that’s part of the reason I’d like to see her and Mark Oshiro on the ballot – their very presence would expand what we see as “fan writing.”
Plus, I am personally a fan of bloggers like Ana Mardoll, who talk about genre fiction in one post, feminism in the next, and the wives of Henry VIII in the third. Because fuck, that’s the kind of blogger I want to be – so I do love seeing it done well.

Examples: “L” is for Madonna-Whore Complex (deconstructing an article about Twilight that is, if possible, EVEN MORE problematic than Twilight), Twilight: Carried in the Arms of Assholes (fascinating exploration of the appropriation of disability in the Twilight series), Buffy: Freebird (talks the character of Joyce and emotional abuse, and WHOA, I DID NOT SEE IT BEFORE, BUT NOW I DO), The Hunger Games: A Question of Agency

4. Catherynne Valente

I am a huge fan of Catherynne Valente as a fiction writer – but I am, if possible, an even bigger fan of her as a non-fiction writer. No joke, I’ve re-read her Guest of Honor speech for MythCon… five times?

Valente is particularly important as a commentator on fandom and fan writing itself. Yes, very meta of me! Christopher Priest ranted about the Clarke Awards; Catherynne Valente looked at the fan reaction to his post, and turned it into an entire discussion of sexism in fandom. Her post on the Readercon debacle reminded us that Genevieve Valentine’s experience was actually workplace harassment. And when people attacked Valente for refusing to repudiate Requires Hate, Valente wrote a post that simultaneously explored her own problematic behavior (cultural appropriation), and discussed a wider fandom problem. 

Valente does not write often, but when she does, she is on fire.

Other examples: Girl Grit: Feminism, Westerns, Sherlock and Erasure

5. NK Jemisin:

I almost didn’t put NK Jemisin on my final ballot, because I didn’t want more than two professional authors in the fanwriter category. And then I was all “What are you even doing, Suzanne?” because Jemisin’s voice is so critical to the way I think about the field. She, like Valente, has some of the best commentary on fandom on the interwebs. Her posts on sexism, racism and oppression in fan spaces are brilliant and provocative (example discussing racism in fandom)

She also wrote smart posts about video games, on why magic doesn’t need to make sense, and on the use of  sexual violence in her own books.

Yes, it’s frustrating that Jemisin can simultaneously be both a brilliant fiction writer, and a brilliant fan writer. But she is, so I must recognize her.

Honorable Mentions: I read so many people who deserve a nomination, and sadly, not all of them can end up on my final ballot.

Tansy Rayner Roberts, for her discussions of Domesticity in Doctor Who, her series on Women in Comic Books, her Xena posts, and her article on Historically Authentic Sexism in Fantasy.

Liz Bourke, for her series Sleeps With Monsters on Tor.com (The Smurfette Principle is a good example of the series)

Abigail Nussbaum, for being the essayist and reviewer I wish I were, and for her spectacular, worldview-changing article Women and Horses, which asks: “Why are we, on the one hand, outraged by the deaths of horses on the set of Luck, and on the other, casually accepting of the potential mistreatment of human women on the set of Game of Thrones?” (particularly when those women are underage).

Best Related Work: 

Chicks Dig Comics edited by Lynne M. Thomas and Sigrid Ellis. Has lots of very fun, very smart articles, and is responsible for introducing me to Kelly Sue Deconnick, Amanda Connor, Greg Rucka and Marjorie Liu.

Best Graphic Story:

1. Saga, Volume 1 by Brian K. Vaughn and Fiona Staples

Saga is… strangely unepic, for a story named “Saga” that opens with a tale of star-crossed lovers from warring civilizations. Rather than aiming for obvious epic themes, Vaughn makes the comic an intimate, almost domestic, story about an odd couple escaping from the forces that want them dead… all while trying to take care of their newborn (urgh, diapers!)
The plot is weird and brutal. The worldbuilding is ridiculous, and I mean that as a compliment. Staples and Vaughn’s worldbuilding strategy seems to consist of throwing random stuff at the wall, and seeing what sticks – but they’re talented enough that it works out beautifully. And the characters are both atypical and compelling.

2. Nimona by Noelle Stevenson

A ridiculously fun, well-drawn webcomic I stumbled on a few weeks ago. It chronicles how the adventures of Lord Balister Blackheart, the biggest name in Supervillainy, go terribly wrong when he takes on a sidekick: Nimona, a shapechanging teenager.

It’s hilarious and it has lots of fun meta-commentary about superheroes, epic fantasy and villains. I’m in internet love.

Also, Sir Ambrosius Goldenlion (Lord Ballister Blackheart’s greatest enemy) has The Best Hair. Nomination for that alone, quite frankly.

Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form: 

I’m not going to talk about my reasons for these, because they’re not strikingly different from what I’ve seen on other lists.

1. The Hunger Games
2. The Avengers
3. The Dark Knight Rises
4. Brave
5. The Legend of Korra, Season One.

Okay, about the last: I had some SERIOUS problems with the first season of The Legend of Korra (LOK). In fact, I just finished it last night, and spent a good hour ranting at my boyfriend. But I still think the series had incredible animation, some brilliant plots (alongside less-than-brilliant-ones) and wonderful characters (Tenzin! Chief Bei Fong! Korra! Asami!)
Is it perfect?
No.
But I would like to see it on the ballot. 

Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form: 

I have zero nominations here, because I am so not caught up on current SF/F television. I will say that I would be very happy to see episodes that AREN’T from Doctor Who on this list. Have you considered The Legend of Korra, My Little Pony, Community or Fringe for nominations? You should!

Best Professional Artist: 

Listen, I’m not an expert on art, and usually, I wouldn’t care about this category. But because I am a professional misandrist and I hate all men* – and also because very few women are ever nominated in this category – I wanted to find women artists who deserved a nomination.

And yes, this is rather necessary. From my cursory research, I don’t think a single woman has been nominated for this category in the last DECADE.

*(May Not Be A Factual Statement)

1. Julie Dillon (AKA: Why The Hell Hasn’t She Been Nominated)

I regularly use her art as wallpaper for my computer. Can you blame me?

Julie Dillon breaking through

Breaking Through

The Dala Horse (Julie Dillon)

The Dala Horse (Julie Dillon)

2. Fiona Staples

Stapes is responsible for both the interior illustrations, and the covers for Saga. I don’t usually notice the art in comic books, but Staples’ work is so richly, gloriously bizarre that I can’t NOT notice.

Saga Issue one cover fiona staples

Saga, issue one

Saga Chapter 3 Fiona Staples

Saga chapter 3

Saga Fiona Staples

The Stalk (Saga)

3. Kathleen Jennings 

I’m a huge fan of Jennings’ lovely, whimsical book covers – I particularly love how she uses wraparound effects. Her illustrations for Eclipse Online are also wonderful.

Kat Jennings

The Memcordist by Lavie Tidhar, illustrated by Kat Jennings

Stranger Things Happen by Kelly Link

Cover and Dustjacket for Stranger Things Happen by Kelly Link

4. Amy Reeder 

I’ve been a fan of Amy Reeder’s for a very long time – even though I wasn’t aware of it. My wordpress icon? The Batwoman picture?

Amy Reeder Batwoman

Batwoman by Amy Reeder

Yep! Drawn by Amy Reeder.

Although the Batwoman franchise tends to be known for JH Williams’ artwork, some of the most iconic covers come from Reeder’s pen (I am using one of them as my wallpaper right now). And her artwork on the creator-owned Halloween Eve is stunning. I wish I’d known I was a fan of hers before!

Amy Reeder Halloween Eve

Halloween Eve

Batwoman Amy Reeder

Batwoman, Issue 9 by Amy Reeder

5. Ana Juan

Hat Tip to The Book Smugglers for this recommendation – I was trying to find a fifth nominee, to no avail, when their post on Hugo nominations came out. I’ve loved the artwork in Catherynne Valente’s Fairyland books, but I never looked up the artist. Juan’s work is beautiful, whimsical, and a bit off-kilter.

Fairyland Ana Juan

Ana Juan

The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland And Led The Revels There by Catherynne Valente

Best Fan Artist 

1. Kathleen Jennings, for all her daleks on her blog – and specifically, for drawing Daleks into all of our favorite books and movies.

2. Noelle Stevenson for Nimona (not a professional work – she’s not, as far as I can tell, getting paid). Because her work is fun and beautiful and witty, and reminds me of nothing so much as Kate Beaton

Nimona by Noelle Stevenson

Best Semi-Prozine: 

The Mary Sue: A guide to geek girl culture. I love The Mary Sue, and they serve my primary source of SF/F news. The writers are funny and incisive, the coverage is wide-ranging, the politics are feminist and progressive.

Best Fanzine: The Book Smugglers: I am counting The Book Smugglers as a fanzine rather than as fan writers, because there are TWO writers on The Book Smugglers. And they deserve a nomination for all the work they do. My god, they publish a post a day, and although Ana and Thea don’t cover speculative fiction exclusively, they do write a whole lot about the genre. Their book reviews are wonderful and incisive, and their genre commentary is always on-point.

Ana and Thea also host an annual blog event called Smugglivus, when they invite authors and bloggers to talk about the year past. It is responsible for introducing me to waaaaaaay too many good books.

Best Fancast: 

Galactic Suburbia (and not just because they put me on their award honors list!)

Galactic Suburbia is a feminist podcast, and thus I am contractually obligated to love them. Fortunately, they make it easy on me, by being perpetually wonderful, and funny, and outraged. Plus, they keep me up to date with all of the Australian Speculative Fiction news (important, since I am a provincial USian).

Last year, I said I was nominating them “because they are awesome. And they make me read ALL the good books.”

And they are still awesome, and making me read all the good books. I really hope they make the ballot again this year.

****

PHEW.

And with that, my friends, my Hugo Nominations are in!

*****

A couple brief announcements, for those of you who haven’t fallen asleep yet!

1. For the purposes of me not getting super-confused ALL THE TIME, I’m now going by the name I use in non-internet life (Suzanne). I get SUPER-CONFUSED whenever anyone uses the name “CD” to refer to me. And although this is a pseudonymous blog, I don’t think using my real name will cause anyone to figure out my ultra-secret identity.
So yes, from now on, I am Suzanne (and my preferred pronoun is “she”).

Of course, you are also welcome to refer to the blog name, full stop (Culturally Disoriented), or to call me The Feminist Batwoman (even though I am NOT the Feminist Batwoman. LET’S BE CLEAR).

2. I have a tumblr! Which has absolutely zero original content. I just reblog a lot of kittens and GIFS. But if you’re interested, I’m over at Feminist Batwoman (although, again, I AM NOT THE FEMINIST BATWOMAN).

3. Content has been slow here! For lots of reasons. Mostly, but not solely medical. I switched antidepressants over winter break, and unfortunately, the new medications caused some pretty brutal side effects. So I am now OFF those antidepressants, which means I am off antidepressants completely, and the transition has been… rough. I also ended up at the ER twice for totally unrelated reasons, because my body hates me right now.
Anyway, content is likely to REMAIN slow for a bit. But I am still here, so bear with me! There’s a GIANT POST OF DOOM coming up. It has lots and lots of statistics! About women in SF/F television! IT IS GIANT! The research is DONE. So it is ALMOST READY.


I Never Wanted to be a Boy (A Tribute to Authors)

[This post is a companion piece of sorts to my “How Power Rangers Made Me a Feminist” post, although you don’t need to have read that post to read this one. In the Power Rangers post, I discussed how sexism in TV shows had a negative effect on me growing up, while in this post, I discuss how the awesome books I read when I was a kid had a good effect on me as I grew up. You see, I don’t hate everything! Just the terrible stuff]

***

I never wanted to be a boy.

And it turns out, that’s somewhat of an unusual experience.

***

Back during my finals season (*shudder*), a series of interrelated blog posts penned by female speculative fiction authors went up. First it was Stina Leicht. Then Kate Elliot. Then Kirstyn McDermott. and N.K. Jemisin. There are probably more I missed.  I was, of course, dying of finals, so I couldn’t do anything more than gather links. But there was something so powerful, and so disturbing, about these women’s stories, that I kept on going back to them.

Let’s see if you can spot the common thread, shall we?

Stina Leicht: “[Girls] are barraged with the knowledge that the world is a dangerous place for them specifically at an early age. I have memories of such information filtering down to me at age eight through ten. So much so, that I went through a phase of denial. I took on male behaviors, thinking that would make me safe. (I was a tomboy.) I also went through a phase of not wanting to be female (…) because I was beginning to understand what was ahead and that the world did not like females.”

Kirstyn McDermott: “I was a tomboy for most of my childhood. Thankfully, I have a wonderful mother who I can’t ever remember saying that I couldn’t/shouldn’t do something or like something or be something just because I was a girl […] I do remember being told such things by lots of other people, though — including some male relatives. Although I didn’t think I ever consciously took that on board when I was a kid . . .  I reckon it did manage to seep in. And I reckon I reacted to it just the way Stina Leicht did, by rebelling against everything girlish[…] Because being a girl isn’t safe.”

Kate Elliot (guest-posting at The Fantasy Book Cafe): “What I saw was that the things I yearned for–adventure, travel, sword fights, the excitement engaged in by characters in the fiction I loved to read–and the things I had–ambition to strive for lofty goals, an inner drive, a questing mind that wanted to discover–were things that society and literature and film told me were reserved for boys. When I was in 7th grade and twelve years old,  my Language Arts teacher […]  gave us a questionnaire of “fill in the blank” questions meant, I suppose, to make us think about our selves and our lives […] The last question was the most open-ended one: “I wish . . . ”
I wrote: I wish I was a boy.
What it meant to me was that it wasn’t worth being a girl.
Being a girl was second-class, even in some ways shameful. Boys got the good things, they were clearly seen to be better, it was obviously better to be a boy, and furthermore, the dreams I had and the desires and hopes were boy dreams, not girl dreams.”

N.K. Jemisin (guest posting at The Fantasy Book Cafe): “I did what I could to reject the GIRL box whenever I could. To that end I’d started reading science fiction — but never fantasy, because fantasy was girly […] Fantasy was full of women in scraps of stupid-looking armor, being rescued or having relationships or healing people or something. Science fiction was full of men going places and doing things […] Then I clearly remember thinking, but I’m a girl. And that was it. It wasn’t an especially shocking realization, but it was a profound one. In that moment I began to understand: the problem wasn’t that some books were infested with girl cooties; the real problem was my irrational fear of girliness. And myself.”

Did you spot it?

It’s fairly obvious, but I’ll paraphrase it for practicality’s sake. When they were young, these women all went through a period where they wanted to be a boy and/or they hated being a girl.

[Cue Sigmund Freud jumping out and yelling “PENIS ENVY” at the top of his lungs. Calm down, Freud]

I don’t know about other people, but I find these stories very hard to read. To me, they show how, from a very young age, we teach girls to hate themselves, to think of themselves as second class, as worthless, as unsafe. Even smart, strong, successful women like Kate Elliot, N.K. Jemisin, Stina Leicht and Kirstyn McDermott – women who I might (stupidly) expect to have been unaffected by the negative effects of sexism (again, very stupid assumption) – had to go through a long, sometimes painful, phase where they reconciled themselves to their status as women.

And no one should have to reconcile themselves to their gender.

[Quick side-note: Obviously this particular “I want to be a boy” phenomenon is quite different from transgendered people, whose gender identity does not match their birth sex. But transgendered people shouldn’t have to reconcile themselves to their birth sex either; they should be able to safely live as the gender they identify with.//End side note//]

But this phenomenon is not restricted to the four women listed above. If I take a moment to think about it, I can list at least two or three close female friends who have admitted to going through “boy” phases. I can certainly think of more who have deliberately rejected anything “girly.” And then, when I talked to my mother about these stories, she said she’d felt exactly the same way when she was a kid. She’d gone through a phase where she decided she didn’t like being a girl, so she dressed like a boy, talked like a boy and adopted “boy” mannerisms [I saw the pictures. There is proof]. Which shocked the hell out of me, because I’ve always thought my mother was extraordinarily comfortable in the way she expressed her gender identity.

When I think about it, it’s staggeringly common, this desire to be a boy. And on an intellectual level, I completely understand it. Being a girl in our society means not being safe. Being a girl means being judged according to norms which, for all the changes in the past fifty years, are still very traditional. Being a girl means your body is public property. Being a girl means that your rights are a political ping-pong ball; a”hot-button issue.” Being a girl means people feel free to tell you to shut up, sit down and make them a sandwich.

Wanting to be a boy – or at least, not wanting to be a girl – makes total sense.

So why didn’t I ever want to be one?

Because I never did. I’ve thought about this a lot in the past couple weeks, and I cannot, for the life of me, think of any period in my life where I wanted to be a boy. I can’t even think of a period when I really rejected “femininity” (whatever that means) [ Sure, I went through a phase where I decapitated my barbie dolls and buried them in the backyard… but I was always a morbid child]. I have a lot of moments where I wish I were as free as a boy, or where I wish I could walk at night and be safe like a boy, or where I wish that women were paid the same amount as men. But I never wanted to be a boy.

Which is strange. When I was a kid, I read tons of science fiction and epic fantasy – traditionally “male” genres. For years, my greatest ambition was to be – I kid you not – a warrior. I spent hours practicing side kicks against an tree in our backyard. I still have a big heavy stick in my room I used to practice “staff fighting.” Somewhere in my house ( I will not reveal where) is a diary where I recorded my “training” sessions (Hey, don’t judge me, okay? At least I wasn’t plotting the nuclear apocalypse). I wasn’t quite a tomboy, but I was pretty close.

So given how much of my identity was “male” oriented, why didn’t I ever want to be a boy?

On some level, I think I knew, even from a young age, that girls could do anything they wanted to, and the problem wasn’t with girls, it was with people and institutions who didn’t get that. So yes, I could read science fiction as a girl, and yes, I could beat a tree to a pulp as a girl, and there wasn’t anything wrong with me.

But I don’t think this belief came because I was smarter or wiser or better educated than girls who did go through a “I want to be a boy” phase.

I think it was because of books.

Kate Elliot: “After that, at the tender age of 15, I decided I had had enough of there not being anyone like me even in my own stories. I decided to write about girls, about women–about men, too–but women in equal space and equal importance to the story. This was not a small decision. It went against what I saw when I read; it went against received wisdom, especially in adventure stories […] I realized that in my own small way I might help overturn this diminishment of female lives not only by portraying women in diverse ways that allowed women a full range of personalities, occupations, roles, and stories, but also by respecting the centrality and importance of the women’s work so often considered (often by women) trivial, demeaning, and lesser.”

Tamora Pierce: “Why do I write so many strong female characters? When I was a kid, 7-8 books out of all books written for kids through teens had boy heroes. Those that had girl heroes showed them at “feminine” pursuits, or if they were a little feisty, a male hero had to bail them out by book’s end (…) When I encountered fantasy, I had the same problem: virtually no girl heroes. The ones I found, adult women all, settled down, hated other women, or died. I didn’t understand why there were no girls (or those that existed were severely compromised) in the adventure books, so I began to write what I wanted to read: adventure books with girl heroes.”

Kate Elliot and Tamora Pierce didn’t see female characters, so they started writing them. You know who else did that? Joanna Russ, James Tiptree Jr., Patricia Wrede, Louise Fitzhugh, N.K. Jemisin, Gail Carson Levine, Robin McKinley, Seanan McGuire, Nancy Farmer – the list goes on. And on. There are droves of female authors who grew up reading books with almost no female protagonists, and who turned around and said: “Screw that. I’m writing about chicks.”

And guess who grew up reading those books?

I did.

I read Tamora Pierce. I read Robin McKinley. I read Madeleine L’Engle. I read Harriet the Spy and Ella Enchanted and Dealing with Dragons. I read The Babysitter’s Club (yes, The Babysitter’s Club, you gotta problem with that?). I read Nancy Farmer. I devoured Sailor Moon and Yoko Tsuno. I read Hope was Here and Born Confused.

In these books girls were the heroes – all kinds of heroes. They were knights and policewomen, spies and politicians, ordinary students and fashion experts, electricians and caterers, waitresses and magic girls, aliens and historians – oh my!

So if I didn’t see my girlhood as limiting me, it was because in the world of my reading, there were no limits to what a girl could be, or to how she could save the day.

You know why I wanted to be a warrior when I was a kid? Because I was reading Tamora Pierce. You know why I didn’t see being a warrior as a “male” pursuit? Because Tamora Pierce’s warriors were female. Even in the Alanna series, when Alanna was the only female knight, there were other women warriors [Thayet and Buri, to name a few]. So when I was pounding that tree into a pulp, I was doing it in the grand tradition of Keladry of Mindelan, Buriram Tourakom, Alanna the Lioness and Daja Kisubo (although I’m sure none of them would be silly enough to practice kicking on a tree).

Eventually, my warrior ways (god, this is embarrassing. I’m so glad this blog is under a pseudonym) – prompted me to take Tae-Kwon-Do lessons. Which was lovely, except for the fact that the instructors would always try to goad male students by saying:

“Are you going to get a girl beat you?”

[Spoiler warning: Yes]

Or: “You hit like a girl!”

[No shit, Sherlock. I am a girl]

But you know what? Even though that bothered the hell out of me (and it went straight into my growing realization that “Wow, people are kind of sexist”) – I knew better. I knew no one could joust like Keladry of Mindelan or swordfight better than Alanna the Lioness. I knew no one was stealthier than Harriet the Spy or braver than Usagi (AKA: Sailor Moon) or more loyal than Dimple Lala. I knew no one was cleverer than Ella and no one was smarter than Yoko Tsuno.

I knew that there was nothing shameful with being “like a girl.”

And someday, everyone else was going to figure it out.

So to all those authors who grew up wishing to be boys. Who grew up knowing that being a girl was unsafe, that being a girl made you “lesser than.” To all of you who then turned around and said: “Screw this, I’m writing about chicks.” Who said “girl can be the heroes.” Who were brave enough, and strong enough, and determined enough, to fight the good fight. Who told the people who thought there was no market for girl heroes “You’re wrong” and who got those books published anyways.

To all those authors, in short, who made it possible for me to have a shelf upon shelf of fantastic books with smart, strong, independent women as heroes.

Thank you.

I have never wanted to be a boy. I have always been happy to be a girl. And it’s because you showed me that being a girl was great.

Thank you.

And to all those people who say “but it’s just a book/a video game/ a comic book. It’s not real. Everyone knows it’s not real. So it doesn’t affect you. Now stop complaining about the lack of female/queer/people of color/ disabled/etc. characters and go make me a sandwich.”

I say: “You’re wrong. And go make yourself that sandwich. Git.”

The End

[Giant disclaimer: the state of fiction is nowhere near equitable enough, either when it comes to female characters, or to other marginalized character s(queer, people of color, trans, disabled etc.). In fact, even though I read a lot of books with female protagonists as a child, I still read more books with male protagonists (and that was with me actively trying to FIND books with female protagonists). We’re not there yet. But the fight is worth it.]

Related Posts:

How Power Rangers turned me into a Feminist

Eight Great Books of Science Fiction for Women (an Alternative List)

WisCon 36 Wrapup: Please Don’t Tame the Shrew

The Return of the Secret Feminist Cabal


What happens at WisCon stays at WisCon. Or not.

Yes, I know that’s the worst title in the history of forever.

Actually, there are probably worst titles in the history of FOREVER. But this one’s definitely in the top ten. Or fifteen.

Anyways! Back to the point. This, my friends, is part two of my epic quest to chronicle WisCon 36. Part one is back HERE.

In this edition, I’m covering the events of Friday the 26th and Saturday the 27th. you’ll read about (among others) my massive paper-related freakout(s), the joy of “Chicks Dig Comics” and a reading by one of my favorite authors, N.K. Jemisin. There will be bonus appearances by The Other Cat and My Awesome Brother.

I should add that this is a very long post. A very, very long post. I am recapping two super-full days of an incredible convention, and I am a verbose writer at the best of times. So get thee a snack and a coffee (or some booze (unless you’re under 18 in Canada/Europe or under 21 in the USA)) and sit back. Relax. Prepare to experience the Secret Feminist Cabal.

Space Babe Tiptree WisCon 36

The Space Babe demands MORE CON REPORTS!

FRIDAY

Friday (during the day) I was freaking out. Not surprising, given that I was presenting a paper on Saturday. And that the paper was (naturally) not done. I tend to write my papers out long-hand before typing them up, so my living room was covered with loose-leaf paper, academic textbooks and post-its. My poor mother walked in and had a freakout of her own, which is understandable, since you couldn’t see the floor of the room at all anymore.

Which leads me to wonder what kind of stupid, asinine idiot would turn in a paper proposal to a Con where she was hoping to have FUN?

Oh, right. That idiot would be me.

Moving on.

I skipped The Gathering and the First Timers dinner to keep working on the paper. This turned out to be a terrible idea because by this point, I was freaking out so much that I wasn’t actually getting any work done. Here was the scene:

C.D.  paces through the house, muttering incoherently about monstrosity

C.D. has a EUREKA moment and writes down a brilliant idea on a piece of paper

C.D. resumes pacing through the house

C.D. then realizes she’s lost her paper. The one with the brilliant idea.

C.D. freaks out and starts looking for the paper

Thirty minutes later, C.D. realizes that finding the paper is a lost cause

She decides to remember the idea instead

C.D. paces through the house, muttering incoherently about monstrosity

And… so on. You get the idea.

I then decided that the only way to “solve” this paper was to barricade myself in my room until 3:45 the next day, when I had to present it. Because obviously the way to break my freakout cycle was to…keep doing exactly the same thing I’d been doing for the past three days.

Right.

No.

Even I, in my massively mind-warped state, knew this was a terrible idea. So I threw all my work material in my backpack, jumped on my bike and headed to the Con just in time to catch the opening ceremonies.

Well, after fixing my chain, which fell off my bike while I was crossing a heavily trafficked street. Seriously, what was it about this weekend and the bike problems? I disapprove!

Opening Ceremonies

With ease, efficiency and class, I stopped by the registration desk, grabbed my nametag and the program, and found a seat in the ballroom.

[My definition of “ease, efficiency and class,” by the way, is: “covered in bike grease, exhausted and so stressed out that eyelids are twitching maniacally”]

Opening Ceremonies at WisCon are perhaps not the most exciting of all times compared with the rest of the Con, but it was lovely to just bask in the glow of the various con-goers. People are just so darn happy to be there.

Plus, there’s something very relaxing (for me) about watching other people be effective. They have the madness under control. Therefore I too can, perhaps, have the madness under control. I felt my stessed-out nerves melting into a nice, warm puddle of goo as the many hardworking administrators gave critical announcements – a callout for volunteers, a reminder to use microphones, a warning not to take photos without consent (seriously: do not take photos of people at WisCon without asking. This is a good skill to practice in the rest of your life – but at WisCon especially. If you don’t understand why, ask anyone at the Con. Heck, ask me. I wasn’t even there, and I know why), a reminder about the meaning of blue tape (access!) etc.

There were two standout moments in the ceremony for me:

The first began when the  wonderful Ellen Klages impersonated WisCon founding mother Karen Joy Fowler (if you’re not a Sci-Fi fan, you know Karen Joy Fowler as the author of The Jane Austen Book Club, if you are a Sci-Fi Fan, you know her as the author of Sarah Canary and the Nebula-winning short story “What I Didn’t See”). Ellen Klages is possibly the funniest person I’ve ever met in real life (I mean, we haven’t met per se, but we’ve been in the same room at the same time. Totally counts). She and Karen Joy Fowler look and sound absolutely nothing alike, which explains why most of the con-goers dissolved into laughter when Ellen finally revealed her “true identity.”

I should warn Karen Joy Fowler (who absolutely does not read this blog, but that’s not the point) that after Ellen told us Karen were missing WisCon (*sad face*), she said: “Karen is very apologetic and I want all of you to make her pay for it next year.”

Just. You know. Fair warning. Particularly since I’m sure Ellen Klages can come up with very inventive methods of revenge.

Anyways. Ellen was impersonating Karen Joy Fowler for a very good reason: to present Tiptree Winner Andrea Hairston with her Tiptree tiara. Now, usually the Tiptree Winner gets their tiara during the Tiptree ceremony on Sunday. But because Andrea Hairston was also this year’s Guest of Honor – an unprecedented event – the ConCom had decided that she, exceptionally, would get to wear the Tiara the entire weekend.

Least you fail to understand what a big deal this is, let me present the Tiara:

Tiptree Award Tiara WisCon

Exactly.

You see my point. Myriad, who was at WisCon for the first time, decided that, based on the strength of the Tiara alone, one of her life goal was to win the Tiptree Award. Can’t blame her.
I tried to find a picture of Andrea Hairston with the Tiara, by the way, but was sadly incapable. I leave you instead with images of previous winners Geoff Ryman and Catherynne Valente, so you can see how good the Tiara looks on Real Life People.

Catherynne Valente Tiptree Winner Tiara

Catherynne Valente

Geoff Ryman Tiptree Winner Tiara

Geoff Ryman

And Andrea Hairston got to wear the Tiara starting Friday night! Let us all be deeply jealous.

The other crucial Opening Ceremony moment was that Myriad and I met in real life for the first time in… four years? Five?
Whatever. It had been a REALLY long time. Now that I think about it, Myriad and I had very few Real Life Interactions prior to WisCon. Although we went to high school together, we were never in the same classes. Although we were in a writing group together, the writing group was online(well, she was the fearless leader of the writing group, and I was one of the people who kept emailing her asking for extensions and then turning in 20,000 word “short stories” (yes, my problems with brevity started young)). Although we were both in the same theater group, we were never in the same plays… you get the idea. So yeah, this WisCon was one of the first time we spent Real Life Time together. And as it turns out, we (not surprisingly) had a lot to talk about. If you were at WisCon, you probably saw us at some point, because we kept having long discussions about [Power rangers/Digimon/Tamora Pierce/Rape/Sherri Tepper/Sci-Fi Gossip/Insert Other Subject Here]. We usually had these conversations in random places where other people were congregating (like the ConSuite, or in front of the Dessert Salon). So yeah. You probably saw us. And, er, we probably got in your way. Sorry!

[Myriad and I also kept having really hilarious run-ins, because although we never made plans to meet up during the convention, we consistently ended up at the same panels. Great minds think alike!]

Chicks Dig Comics! (panel)

I probably should have gone home to work at this point, but I desperately wanted to go to at least one panel, and I desperately wanted it to be this one. So, forsaking all good thought…I went.

But there was a reason to my madness. You see, when I was young, I watched the X-men and Batman TV series, with the predictable result that I became obsessed with superheroes. You say the word X-men near me and you won’t be able to shut me up for a year. If you’re lucky.
I also read lots of comics. But they weren’t American comics. I read french Bandes Dessinees. I read the European comic W.I.T.C.H. I read Manga. I read Sailor Moon.

Yoko Tsuno Roger Leloup

One of my childhood heroines (not to mention my first exposure to Science Fiction) – Yoko Tsuno

And then, when I was around fifteen, I tried reading American comics.  I’ll be honest, I didn’t try very hard, and I probably tried in the wrong places – but I had a lot of bad experiences with superhero comics, particularly with the rather rampant sexism. And so I stopped trying.

But I’ve decided to get back into comics. I just love them too much to stop. I must. Have. Superheroes.

And in the spirit of getting back into comics… I went to the Chicks Dig Comics panel (which is based on the book of the same name).

And the panelists had booze. They did not give us the booze. But they had booze. Thus, they were badass. And awesome.

The panel was made up of women who had essays in Chicks Dig Comics (the book):  Sigrid Ellis (editor of Chicks Dig Comics), Lynne Thomas (other Editor of Chicks Dig Comics, also  and Hugo Winning Editor of Chicks Dig Time Lords), Elizabeth Bear (Very Famous Author of, most recently, The Range of Ghosts), Sarah Monette (Very Famous Author of, most recently, Somewhere Beneath Those Waves) Tara O’Shea (Hugo Winning Editor of Chicks Dig Time Lords), Caroline Pruett (a blogger at Fantastic-Fangirls), Delia Sherman (Very Famous and Now Andre Norton Award Winning Author of The Freedom Maze), Jennifer Margaret Smith (a graduate student in Media and Cultural Studies and a blogger at Fantastic Fangirls) and Tammy Garrison (one of the creators of Torchwood Babiez).

They were all, generally, quite awesome. And rather than attempt to summarize their brilliance, I’m just going to write up some particularly relevant (or hilarious) quotes: (I have given attribution where I remembered to note it down, but in the heat of notetaking, names were lost. Apologies!):

Quotes and Stories from Chicks Dig Comics:

“How many [female comic fans] are there?”
“A Fuckmetric ton.” 

Black Canary Fishnets

Black Canary

Lynne Thomas: “I want to know where Black Canary buys her fishnets. Because those have to be some industrial strength Drag Queen fishnets.”

Lynne Thomas: “Also, Nightwing has a mighty fine ass.”
Tara O’Shea: “As a watcher of Teen Titans, I agree.”

Tammy Garrison: “I used to go to a gay pornshop to get Nightwing comics because it was the only place I could get it.”
Elizabeth Bear: *grabs phone* “I’m tweeting it! I’m tweeting it!” (ah, the technology age)

Delia Sherman: “Walking into a comic book store as a 60 year old woman is still difficult.”

Lynne Thomas shared a telling incident. The panel had planned to throw a Chicks Dig Comics party at WisCon the next night, so Thomas went to Party City in Madison, hoping to get some (female) superhero themed decorations. She was specifically thinking of Black Widow, since the Avengers are out right now, and Black Widow is hot property.

There were none. There were no decorations/napkins/whatev’s with Black Widow on them. There were no female superhero themed decorations/napkins/whatev’s at all. There were TONS of decorations/napkins/whatev’s with male superheros on them. When Lynne Thomas asked why, they told her that she should have called to order early, since she wanted a “specialized item.”

Lynne Thomas: “Not one bloody female superhero”
Tara O’Shea: “Well, there are only 150000 items in the store.”

Lynne Thomas: “They think those items won’t sell. I wanted to tell them: “You know you’re losing a fuck-ton of money, right?””

Captain Marvel Carol Danvers Kelly Sue DeConnick

Captain Marvel. Upcoming. Will be the only female led series at Marvel.

One audience member (who I later found out was Kelly Sue DeConnick, the writer for the upcoming Marvel series Captain Marvel (female superhero! YAY!)) then revealed that according to in-house research at Marvel (and DeConnick works for Marvel, so she would know) the two characters from The Avengers who are testing the best in terms of audience reception are Black Widow and The Hulk.

So yes. They are indeed “losing a fuck-ton of money.”

Oh, and apparently 40% of tickets for The Avengers are being bought by women. But women aren’t interested in superheroes! No duh!

Someone brought up their least favorite topic on internet comic sites – “How do I get my girlfriend into Comics?”

Sigrid Ellis: “Which is like asking “How do I get my girlfriend into TV?”
Lynne Thomas: “Why do you need to ask the internet what your girlfriend will like to read?”
Three panelists, simultaneously: “Have you tried ASKING HER?”

Tara O’Shea : “I have a problem with Catwoman running on rooftops in heels with no bras and Double D breasts –
Elizabeth Bear: “Let’s be honest, those aren’t double D’s. Those are H’s.”

Another panelist talked about her annoyance at comic fans who are mad that Idris Elba – a black man – was cast as Heimdall in Thor. “They say “He’s not norse.” And I say “They’re freaking aliens, you idiots.””

Proving that this was indeed a feminist convention, Lynne Thomas said: “Two things: Alison Bechdel.” and EVERYONE, including the audience, said: ‘YES”

[If you don’t know who Alison Bechdel is, get thee to Google Fu!]

It was all-in-all, an exhilarating, funny panel full of eloquent and passionate speakers. I have more thoughts about it, which I will save for my recap of the Women in Comics panel… (which is later in this post. Yes, there’s more. My posts never end. They NEVER END)

I shall leave my last words to the great Elizabeth Bear, who, contemplating the lack of questions from the audience, said: “We’ve stunned you with our eloquence and our booze.”

Yes. Yes they did. (although I, sadly, was never given any of the booze)

The All-Nighter of Dooooooom:

After the Chicks Dig Comics panel, I hopped on my bike, hightailed it back to the Mansion of Misericorde (ie: home) and…

pulled an all-nighter.

A very efficient all-nighter, I should add. Unlike in the afternoon, when I was pacing around and freaking out, here, I put on Daft Punk (the best writing music) and powered through my draft and a full edit in under eight hours. Which is quite fast for me.

The object lesson here is: when one has entered into a giant cycle of freaking out, break the cycle by getting out of the house. ideally, you would go to a Feminist Sci-Fi conference, but when that’s not available… take a walk? Go to a bookstore? Etc? Because then you will work better.

[Let us note that I will promptly forget this lesson for my next paper…]

Space babe Tiptree Award WisCon

The Space Babe approves of All-Nighters

I probably would have been working even better if the Other Cat had not insisted I pet her every three seconds, but we can’t have everything.The Other Cat, by the way, is not The Cat, who lives in my home in College. This is The Other Cat, who lives in my… Madison Home. The Other Cat really loves when someone is up at three in the morning, because then someone is up to pet her.

And we all know that my primary purpose in life is to pet cats [for what other reason were humans put on the earth, after all?]

The Other Cat was morally opposed to me taking a nap, but I insisted, and so managed to sleep for about two hours before the start of the convention. Which was good: I would need all my fortitude to face the events of Saturday.

Because on Saturday… my Brother was coming to the convention with me.

Dun. Dun. Duuuuuunnnnn.

As per our usual, it took us a good half hour longer than expected to get out the door, mostly because my brother was glued to his book (Blackout by Mira Grant). And also because we discovered that our printer was out of ink… so my paper was unreadable.

Hem.

But we arrived with grace and charm (i.e: peeved and annoyed) at the convention, and headed straight to a panel on Women in Comics (are you sensing a theme?)

Women in Comics

This panel was obviously quite similar to Chicks Dig Comics, but it had a focus on more recent events – it was about what the past year had brought for women in comics (including female characters and creators). It also had different panelists – although Tara O’Shea was on both panels, here she was joined by Jessica Plummer (the president of Girl-Wonder.Org), Susan Simensky Bietila (a specialist in independent and alternative comics), Kelly Sue DeConnick (the aforementioned writer for the forthcoming comic Captain Marvel) and Monica Midbon ( a comics and science fiction fan).

It was also filled with a lot of, er, industry gossip, which panel-goers were specifically asked not to tweet or write about. So I have lots of really interesting industry info that I… can’t write about (I know! I am stunning you with my eloquence).

But! There are lots of things I can talk about!

There was a lot – a whole lot – of ranting about the D.C. reboot. And most of the ranting centered around the de-wheelchairing of Barbara Gordon. Barbara Gordon was once Batgirl, but then she was shot and disabled and became a badass crime fighter/computer hacker called “Oracle.” She was one of the most popular handicapped characters of all times. And for the reboot… DC gave her back her legs. Which… how they didn’t anticipate the backlash it would get is beyond me (particularly since it meant getting rid of the very popular batgirl, Stephanie Brown). They didn’t think taking an icon of the handicapped community and fixing her spine  was going to cause backlash?
Trust me. The women in both the Chicks Dig Comics and Women in Comics panels had over a year to get over it. They are not over it.

Oracle Barbara Gordon Batgirl

Barbara Gordon/Oracle

Jessica Plummer summed up her feelings on the situation by saying: “You can corner me at WisCon at any time and I will get angry. I will get very angry.”

Moving beyond Batgirl, Kelly Sue DeConnick confirmed that she was one of the female writers D.C. talked to when planning their reboot. D.C. has widely been criticized for having three female writers and a hundred and fifty seven male ones, so it’s good to know that they at least talked to other women, even if they didn’t hire them (or the women themselves weren’t interested). This, by the way, is not me letting DC off the hook: you should be able to do better than 3%.

DeConnick also argued that the best way to get more women writers in the field was through mentorship. But, as she pointed out, the current mainstream comic book system demands such quick turnaround that it doesn’t support breaking anyone new in, which means only the old guard – (mostly) white men – are trained to write. In other words: if we want more women in comics, we have to train them, and right now, no one has time to train them.

Susan Bietila thought that independent comic books had far more gender equity than mainstream comics, and then apologized (because we’d been complaining so beautifully about misogyny in comics before). To which Jessica Plummer responded. “You’re right. That’s such a disappointing answer. “There’s no sexism.” God! I hate it when that happens!”

There were other rather hilarious moments, like when Kelly Sue DeConnick explained why it was difficult for her to criticize comics writers. She pointed out that she knew one of them, and he was a good guy: “well, maybe he’s a bad guy. He’s  not an entirely bad guy… because he likes me. Which proves that he’s a man of taste and breeding.”

Or when Tara O’Shea joked that we should stop talking about Black Widow: “We should save this for the Women in Superhero Films panel… which took place last night.”

Jessica Plummer on censorship: “I’m an American! I demand my right to filth.”

And one panelist described a comic book as “Batman’s Mary Sue Fanfic about himself.”

Finally, Kelly Sue DeConnick had the line of the morning when she talked (again) about creating a space for women in comic books: “I still don’t understand how you support professional women by asking them to do volunteer work. I think you support professional women by getting them jobs and paying them.”

I have to say, Kelly Sue DeConnick was brilliant throughout WisCon, and I intend to follow all her future work. I am also officially following Jessica Plummer’s work because she was hilarious and bright and very incisive. Oh, and also Tara O’Shea and Lynne Thomas, both of whom proved why they (and Sigrid Ellis) have managed to make the Chicks Dig… series such a success.

Going back to the big picture: what struck me the most about both the Chicks Dig Comics panel and the Women in Comics panel was how much love and passion all the panelists – and most of the audience – had for the medium. People were interrupting each other (in the best possible way) and jumping up and down, and finishing each other’s thoughts and cracking jokes, and coming up with example after example of great characters – or horrible business practices. In my notebook I wrote down “So! Much! Passion!’ because it just saturated the room.

And there was also this wonderful group feeling – which is something that you get at WisCon more generally, but that I’ve never felt with regards to comics – where I felt like everyone on the panel (and again, in the audience) wanted to have this dialogue, and wanted to make comics better, and, above all other things, just wanted to geek out. Jessica Plummer passed around dozens of comics from her personal collection, Sigrid Ellis brought Lynne Thomas three giant bags of comic books, we all laughed about the crack fanfiction (crack fanfic is the best). I had to tear the X23 comics out of my brother’s hands for fear he would steal them.

One example of this collective spirit was when Kelly Sue DeConnick said she would help anyone who talked to her find stores where they would feel comfortable buying comics:

DeConnick: “”You have the right to a comic book store where you feel welcome. If you email me, I will help you find a comic book store where – ”
Jessica Plummer: “Girl Wonder actually has a map of girl-friendly stores.”
Kelly Sue DeConnick: “That sounds great! More people should know about that! Let’s talk later.”

Collective spirit! Working together! Women! Comics! Nerds!

God, I love WisCon.

By the way, I was quite worried that my brother would be bored at panels (he doesn’t really read comics (yet)), but as we were leaving he asked me: “”Do you think that for gay people and women and – other people who are discriminated against – do you think it’s getting better in comic books?”

And then we had a big discussion about it.

So! Not bored.

And also generally being awesome. I do so love my brother.

Finally, I have a couple recommendations from the two comics panels that I’ll pass on to my lone readers (ie: the FBI):

Two non-fiction texts that were recommended were The Ten Cent Plague by David Hajdu and Do the Gods Wear Capes? by Ben Saunders.
Various panelists raved about the TV series Young Justice.
Tara O’Shea also raved about a Catwoman series known as Her Sister’s Keeper (by Mindy Newell)
And everyone recommended Paul Cornell’s new series Saucer Country (which was described as “The West Wing” meets “Roswell”)

Are you still with me? Is anyone still with me? (this is the longest post of all times. Seriously).

Memory, Bones and Forbidden Lands

My brother got to choose the next panel, and he, not surprisingly, choose to go see N.K. Jemisin’s reading.
We’re both huge, HUGE N.K. Jemisin fans (we buy her books the millisecond they come out) and this was the only programming N.K. Jemisin was doing all weekend. So we had to go.

I have to be honest and say that I’m not a readings person. I’d rather read someone’s work to myself than discover them through a verbal reading – I have a lot of trouble following “read” texts – but for N.K. Jemisin, I was willing to make an exception.

Now, I should be clear that N.K. Jemisin was not the only author at the readings – she was joined by Saladin Ahmed (author of The Throne of the Crescent Moon), Ibi Zoboi (reading from a YA novel manuscript), Neesha Meminger (author of Shine, Coconut Moon) and Daniel Jose Older (author of Salsa Nocturna). All the readings were great (hey, even I thought so, and I don’t… like readings). And N.K. Jemisin has the perfect voice for her books, which sounds like the weirdest compliment ever, but which makes total sense to me. Her reading was particularly fantastic – she read from The Shadowed Sun, which just came out – and my brother and I were on the edge of our seats, hoping for spoilers.

My brother also wrote one line of what I presume is a Shadowed Sun fanfiction, starring… me. And him.  I quote the fanfic in it’s entirety
“Reaper” said R. to C.D. “You’re a Reaper.”
Great, my brother thinks I’m someone who likes to steal souls for fun. Wonderful.

The other standout of the reading was Daniel Jose Older, who read his short story “The Collector,” (which will come out in his collection Salsa Nocturna). The protagonist, a paramedic, faces a classic dilemma: what to do when the woman you’re trying to save is causing the apocalypse. (okay, not so classic). It was a darkly humorous, incisive story, and Older’s interpretation of the voice made it even funnier. I will be on the lookout for his fiction [“The Collector” is also available, read by Older, in a podcast here]

Lunch/Freakout (Part Eleventy Billion)

One of the best parts about WisCon is the Con Suite. The Con Suite has food. Free food. Which means that I didn’t have to buy (or prepare) meals at all for the Con.

Yes, it’s hot dogs and chips and cheese and bananas (and bagels. Let’s not forget the bagels), but it’s edible; you can make a full meal out of it, and it makes the Con that much more affordable. I cannot stress enough how wonderful the Con Suite is. If it hadn’t been there, I would not have survived the weekend.

So during the lunch break (WisCon has a long lunch break with no programming, which I also appreciate, or else I would never stop) my brother and I headed to the Con Suite, grabbed some hot dogs and found a spot in the lobby to eat.

And by “eat” I mean “frantically edit my paper.”

My brother was nice enough to put up with my massive freaking-out/editing/practicing reading aloud. [By the way, if you ever have to read a paper for a conference, a word of advice: always. Always. Always practice reading the paper aloud at least once]

Part of the reason my brother was so accommodating of my freakout was because he had Mira Grant’s new novel Blackout with him. The final volume of the Newsflesh trilogy.

Yes. Exactly.

I’m starting to think that Mira Grant should just film my brother reading her books, because it’s perfect advertising. Observe:

Blackout Mira Grant Cover Newsflesh

My brother’s highest recommendation
[Read the other books FIRST]

Brother:”I have butterflies in my stomach. Actual butterflies. I’ve never had that from reading a book before.”
Brother: “Oh my god. Holy shit. How am I ever going to get through this book? It’s like one WTF polar bear after another.”
(WTF Polar Bear being a reference to Lost, of course).
Brother: ‘Oh no. That’s bad. That’s very bad. That’s extremely bad. I don’t want to read on.”

Let us note that every second we weren’t at a panel (or the Tiptree Awards) he was reading the book. He was done with it by the time we left the Con.

So yeah, I think he liked it.

In a moment of good luck, the Hotel actually turned out to have printers of its own (you may remember that our printer ran out of ink), so I was able to get a readable copy of my paper printed out. Hurrah!

Considering the Female Villain

Panelists: Valerie L. Guyant, Richard Chwedyk (Nebula winning writer and poet), Shayla Dunn, Allison Moon (author of Lunatic Fringe, a novel about lesbian werewolves), Rosemary/Sophy

(a lot of the panelists didn’t have bios, and I… took terrible notes. It’s not that I didn’t love them, because this was a fantastic panel!)

Again, a panel chosen by my brother, but one I probably would have chosen for myself as well. I love villains. I love women. Yet I find that so often, female villains fail to be anything other than stereotypes, and worst of all, misogynistic stereotypes. So yes. How can one have a well0rounded female villain? Can one have a feminist depiction of a female villain? Can a female villain actually be a feminist (without being a straw feminist)?

Plus! VILLAINS ARE AWESOME.

That is all.

I took very few notes during this panel, although it convinced me that I need to watch Avatar: the Last Airbender. And it reminded me of what how badass Mrs. Coulter is (from Phillip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy)

I do, however, have some funny/incisive quotes for your edification:

On female villains who repent and kill themselves: “The Lady always has to sacrifice herself… it’s like an episode of Doctor Who.”

Shayla Dunn:“I have lost my thought. If you find a thought around the room, return it to me.”

On the difference between Sexuality and Sexualization (Allison Moon): “Sexuality is something you define for yourself. Sexualization is something that is done to you.”

On the difference between men and women’s stereotypical motivations for being “crazy” and evil: “When a man goes crazy and becomes a villain, it’s because a science experiment went terribly wrong. When a woman goes crazy and becomes a villain, it’s because a man left her.”
I thought of so many examples for this one – all the male villains in the recent Spiderman movies, for example, are “crazy” because a science experiement went wrong. I can’t think of a single female villain for whom the same is true. Thoughts?

A really great panel – and my brother’s personal favorite from his day at the Con. He would like to add that Micah, the protagonist of Justine Larbalestier’s Liar, is a wonderful example of a female villain who gets to define her own motivations and actions (possibly because she’s also the protagonist)

Charlize Theron Snow White and the Huntsman

I have high hopes for the Queen as a Villain

So, the idea, my friends, was that this post would cover ALL of Friday and Saturday. We’re about halfway through Saturday, with my panel and the Tiptree Auction left to go. And I’m already at 5000 words. So… I think I should put the rest of Saturday into the next post, don’t you? Before my faithful readers (such as they are) try to assassinate me in my sleep.

So! Next post! Shall contain: my panel (of doom), the Tiptree Auction (possibly the funniest thing of all times, ever) and the various program items for Sunday… which includes a panel on female contortionists in comic books.

[Space Babe still approves of the Con reports]

Assvengers Avengers

Assvengers, unite!

Related Posts:

A Disoriented Con Reporter At Large: WisCon 36 (Thursday) 

My WisCon Schedule

How Power Rangers made me a Feminist


A Disoriented Con Reporter At Large: WisCon 36 (Thursday Edition)

So, it’s been a bit silent on the blog front this past week. I know. I am a bad person. But in my defense, I was at WisCon 36.

Space Babe Tiptree Award

This post was written at the demand of Space Babes everywhere

What is WisCon, you ask?

I believe I will let Andrea Hairston, writer/professor/drama queen and one of WisCon 36’s Guests of Honor, say it for me:

“WisCon is my/our home planet
A moment in great time
A celebration
A revel
Where we dream and scheme, sing and shout
Unravel our torment
Renew our sense of wonder
Burst into the future”
(Impolitic by Andrea Hairston and Debbie Notkin, Aqueduct Press, pg. 3)

If that’s too esoteric for you, I’ll try again. WisCon is a now-36-year-old Feminist Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention. There are parties. There are readings. There are panels where people talk about women in comics and racial diversity and de-gaying and privilege and social justice and the Hunger Games and X-Men and the Power Rangers and Buffy the freakin’ Vampire Slayer. As you can no doubt tell, WisCon is full of awesome. It is also the home of the DAMN TIPTREE AWARD.

The DAMN TIPTREE AWARD, also known as the James Tiptree Jr. Award, is an award given to a work of speculative fiction that best expands or explores our understanding of gender. It was created by Pat Murphy and Karen Joy Fowler at WisCon in 1991. It’s the most badass of all badass awards. Trust me. It’s been won by DAMN fine authors like Gwyneth Jones, Geoff Ryman, Mary Doria Russell and Maureen McHugh. It was named for James Tiptree Jr., Sci-Fi author extraordinaire, who was eventually revealed to be Alice Sheldon (a woman writing under a man’s name? GASP). If you win it, you get to wear a Tiara.

[You also get a check for a thousand dollars, a piece of original artwork, lots of chocolate, and you are serenaded by the entire WisCon membership]

james Tiptree Jr. Award Tiara

Actual James Tiptree Jr. Award Tiara

Like I said: the most Badass of all Badass awards.

I’m a Sci-Fi/Fantasy nerd. I’m also a feminist and a general social justice geek (Have you noticed the blog content? Yes?). So WisCon for me is…indescribably joyful. Your brain explodes with the general brilliance on display. Or, at least, mine does. When I went to WisCon last year for the first time, my reaction was “Where have these people been all my life?” It felt like all the best friends I had never met had just showed up in the same place, and they were all interested in the same things, and they all spoke my language…(let us note that I was too shy to speak to any of my newly found best friends. But they were still my new best friends).

It was rather incredible.

So obviously, I went back this year (WisCon, fortunately, takes place in my hometown, which makes it much easier to get to). And I planned to BLOG from WisCon. Hem. That did not happen. Obviously. Why I believed it would be possible for me to go to the Con for twelve hours a day AND present a paper AND blog at the same time is completely beyond me. Particularly since even my shortest blog posts take two to three hours to write.

Yes, I’m pretty damn delusional, why do you ask?

And then after the con, I was so exhausted that I basically went *SPLAT* on the floor of my bedroom. For three days. And every time I tried to imagine how I was going to fit the enormity of all the con’s awesomeness into a blog post, I started freaking out and just went *SPLAT* on the floor again.

I have a very supportive floor, okay? She and I are very close. She understands my pain.

Actually, you know what? I’m just going to purloin Myriad‘s brilliant analysis of the effects of WisCon:

Myriad Star Ten Thousand WisCon

EXACTLY.

Hem.

But I have finally scraped myself off the floor and crawled over to the couch, burning with the desire to write my damn Con report. Because I cannot keep this awesomeness to myself, my friends. It must be shared with the entire world (or my regular readership, otherwise known as the FBI robots who keep the internet safe). For what other purpose have I been put on this earth?

(The Other Cat’s response to this is: “To pet me.”)

Because I would like to avoid going *SPLAT* again anytime soon (I love the floor, but I think she and I need to take a break, if you know what I mean (she’s getting a little clingy…)), I’m going to post my Con report in several parts. The plan is:

Part one: Thursday recap

Part two: Friday and Saturday recap

Part three: Sunday and Monday recap

with a possible

Part four: Conclusions.

YES, it shall be long. But Space-Babe demands it! She thinks that I should leave no detail out, no information un-recorded. The awesomeness of my Con experience, Space Babe proclaims, must be shared with the masses (Space Babe seems unaware that there are no “masses” reading my blog. But at least I’ll keep the FBI and CIA amused!)

Space babe tiptree WisCon 36

The Space Babe demand a CON REPORT.

By the way, before you ask: Space Babe is the official mascot of the James Tiptree Jr. Award. She flies through the galaxy, fighting injustice, oppression and outdated portrayals of gender roles in speculative fiction. She’s also the fearless leader of the Secret Feminist Cabal (also known as the WisCon membership).

And she’s a BADASS.

So, you know. I do whatever the hell she tells me to do.

THURSDAY:

Officially, WisCon starts on Friday. Unofficially, it begins on Thursday, when the Guests of Honor give a reading at Madison’s resident feminist bookstore, A Room of One’s Own

A Room of One's Own Madison, WI

I went to the GOH reading last year, and there was no way I was missing it this year. Even if I had a giant paper for the Convention to finish writing.

Because I, like a total idiot, decided to propose a paper for the Academic programming. And then the WisCon programmers accepted the aforesaid paper. To which my reaction was:

“Oh, shoot. I didn’t think that would happen.”

Hem.

By Thursday, I was freaking the frack out. I had threatened to empty my savings account to run away to the Bahamas (which shows you the extent of my desperation, since I hate the beach). I had already pulled one all-nighter (my mother nearly called the cops when she saw me up at six in the morning). I was frantically re-outlining the second half of the paper while muttering things like “Monsters ugly! Maidens pretty!” and “It’s all about CYBORGS!”

[As you can see, I’m not the brightest Tanning Bulb in the Academic Tanning Bed]

But I was going to go to the GOH reading if it killed me. So I hopped on my bike and proceeded to nearly get run over by a mail truck. Which was fun.

I was also bringing my younger brother (R.) to the GOH reading because he loves A Room of One’s Own and never misses an occasion to go. Also – what else would you do with your younger brother except bring him to a Feminist Sci-Fi fantasy conference?

(You don’t think twelve year old boys would kill to go to WisCon? You need to take some Vitamin DUH, my good sir/ma’am)

Anyways. When I stopped by my father’s house to pick my brother up (divorced parents are a logistical challenge),  he was not ready to go. Why, you ask?

He didn’t like the way his pants folded over his shoes.

I’m not kidding. We could not leave the house until the pants problem was solved and I had to spend the next ten minutes reviewing pant options and discussing how to pair pants with shoes to avoid bunching.

As you can see, R. was in the WisCon spirit of defying outdated gender norms. I was very proud.

I was less proud when we arrived at A Room of One’s Own and he tried to make off with the store’s entire stock. Possibly I was annoyed because I was trying to make off with the store’s entire stock myself. Don’t get me wrong, I love my brother. But let’s get our priorities straight, okay? When it comes to books, there is no family loyalty. Particularly when we saw that N.K. Jemisin’s The Shadowed Sun was out.

The Shadowed Sun N.K. Jemisin

It’s a minor miracle that R. and I made it to the reading room without either of us emptying our bank accounts. Or offering to do dishes for A Room of One’s Own forever if they let us steal their books. Or killing each other.

The Guests of Honor this year were Debbie Notkin and Andrea Hairston. The Space Babe demands that I give you important background information, so here it is:

Debbie Notkin has been on chair of the WisCon Committee twice, and is the chair of the James Tiptree Jr. Award motherboard. Karen Joy Fowler and Pat Murphy, who initiated the award, have both said that it never would have come off the ground without Debbie Notkin’s tireless work behind the scenes. She’s been a Sci-Fi and Fantasy acquisitions editor for Tor Books and a SF/F bookstore owner.

Debbie Notkin also does body image activist work with photographer Laurie Toby Edison: together, they’ve created two books Women En Large: Images of Fat Nudes and Familiar Men: A Book of Nudes. They also run the body image blog Body Impolitic. Some of Notkin and Edison’s favorite posts were reprinted in the book Impolitic! (the Guest of Honor book published for WisCon by Aqueduct Press) and let me tell you, they are brilliant. Simply brilliant.

Impolitic! Debbie Notkin Andrea Hairston Aqueduct Press

Here’s a random sampling:

On transgender rights: “The right to live in a body that suits you is surely one of the most basic right a human being can have.”(Impolitic, 122)

On the prevalence of stories about people in wheelchairs who “walk again” on TV: “Our culture desperately tries to believe that if you take care of yourself, you will live a really long time and never get sick. Seeing disabled people makes us afraid that we might not live fit and forever. Wheelchairs and the people in them become the bogeyman, the goblin who will be you if you don’t watch your health. To fight the cultural fear, we build myths about people who “walk again.” (Impolic, 118)

[Start reading Body Impolitic. The Space Babe Commands it.]

I know Debbie Notkin by sight, if not personally, because she’s one of the busiest people at WisCon. I swear, she was everywhere last year – I couldn’t have avoided her if I’d tried. When Ellen Klages was auctioning off a naked photograph of Debbie Notkin this year, she joked: “It shows Debbie naked and asleep. You will never see Debbie like this at WisCon. Naked, yes, but asleep, no. That woman does so much. So for anyone curious: this is what Debbie looks like asleep.”

Since Notkin is not a writer, she decided to read the obituary she wrote for her mother’s funeral. Later, a friend of Notkin remarked how typical it was of her to use the spotlight to talk about someone else rather than herself. Notkin’s reading was lovely and moving and surprisingly funny. I meant to take notes, but was too busy listening.

Hem.

Con reporter FAIL.

Debbie Notkin was followed by WisCon 36’s other Guest of Honor, Andrea Hairston. Andrea Hairston is the director of Chrysalis Theater and a Professor of theater and Afro-American studies at Smith College. She writes plays that have been produced at Yale Rep, Rites and Reason, the Kennedy Center, StageWest and on Public Radio. She’s received a fuckmetric ton of playwriting and directing awards. In 2011, she received the International Association of the Fantastic in the Art’s Distinguished Scholarship Award. I knew her before WisCon because I read her paper on Octavia Butler (“Octavia Butler: Praise Song to a Prophetic Artist”) when I was preparing an essay for a conference; Hairston is one of those rare breed of people who actually does academic work in speculative fiction (for which I am deeply, deeply grateful).

Her first novel, Mindscape, won the Carl Brandon Parallex Award, and was on the Phillip K. Dick Award shorlist and the James Tiptree Jr. Award shortlist.

Her second novel, Redwood and Wildfire, came out last year and promptly won the James Tiptree Jr. Award for 2011. Which makes Andrea Hairston the first person to ever have won the Tiptree award in the same year she was WisCon’s Guest of Honor. The Tiptree Jury and the ConCom are made up of completely different people, so the confluence of events was not planned AT ALL. Which makes it all the more exciting.

Redwood and Wildfire cover Andrea Hairston

Andrea Hairston was wearing the most amazing purple hat/tiara/thing (I don’t know what it was, but I want it), and she read from Redwood and Wildfire with musical accompaniment by Pan Morigan. Redwood and Wildfire is, among other things, about the role of African American performers on the stage and on-screen at the turn of the 20th century. In the section Hairston read from, Redwood, a hoodoo conjure woman and actress, is playing the part of a “savage” in some kind of Safari adventure movie when the lion the studios have hired for the scene breaks out of her cage. As Hairston announced the title of her book, she said:

“If you like what you hear, buy the book”
And someone from the audience shouted:
“If you don’t like what you hear, buy the book.”

Which had everyone laughing.

But frankly, I don’t know how you could help but like what you heard. Hairston’s reading was wildly engaging – she’s a consummate performer, and she draws the audience into her work. She had us roaring with laughter with the slightest raise of her eyebrow. Even my brother, who is usually quite fidgety, leaned forwards in his seat, rapt with attention. At the end, he turned to me and asked: “Can I read it after you?”

To which I said: “As long as you don’t try to steal it.”

(spoiler alert: he did try to steal it)

We made it out of the bookstore without stealing any books (but it was tempting) and then headed back to our house.

And then my brother’s bike broke just as it started raining. And not in a “we can just put that chain back on” sort of way. In a “the handlebars are now turned completely backwards” sort of way.

However, my brother and I are resilient. Resourceful. Romanesque. Resolute. In the spirit of WisCon and working through things, we walked through the damn storm, discussing science fiction and feminism all the way. My brother graciously let me blather on about my paper, and pretended to find my whole discussion of monsters and maidens fascinating.

Space Babe Tiptree WisCon

Space Babe was very proud of us

After dropping R. off at my father’s house, I biked to my mother’s house (ah, the logistics of divorce) and then spent the rest of the night (and I do mean: The rest of the night) freaking the frack out as I tried to write my darn paper.

But that’s a story for another time.

NEXT TIME! More tales of WisCon and the Secret Feminist Cabal! Specifically: the tale of Friday and Saturday, which involves a lot of me freaking out, the James Tiptree Jr. Award, and a ton of panels about Women in Comics and Female Villains and other awesome things.

OH!

Crazy Cat

Not The Other Cat, but close

The Other Cat will also make an appearance in my Next Post. Because she helped me write the Damn Paper.

Related Posts:

My WisCon 36 Schedule

How Power Rangers Made Me a Feminist

Eight Great Science Fiction Books for Women

And in Breaking News, American Idol is Still Sexist


Nebula Nominations are Wearing the Awesomepants

The Nebula Nominations are Here! The Nebula Nominations are Here! AAAH!

In case you don’t know, the Nebulas are annual awards given to the best science fiction and fantasy of the year (novel, novelette, short story, movie etc.). Unlike the Hugos, the Nebulas are decided by not fandom, but by creators: only members of the Science fiction and Fantasy Writers of American (SFWA) can vote. They’re pretty crucial awards – in fact, I’d put them right up there with the Hugo and the World Fantasy Award, in terms of visibility and importance to the field.

So the Nebula Shortlist coming out? Totally warrants a freakout.

But before I have the aforementioned freakout, a digression (about another freakout).

Tor.com runs an annual reader’s poll on the best novel of the year. Since they’re a major SF/F hub, I assume that the poll is pretty, well, popular,  and so the results might be a bellweather for the Nebulas and the Hugos. And ever since I’ve seen the aforementioned results, I’ve been having a minor freakout.

The freakout goes like this: OH GOD, a list of the ten books and exactly ONE woman. No authors of color (as far as I can tell – please, someone correct me if I’m wrong). And NO support for the really awesomepants genre-defying, mind-bending fantasmagorical novels I think are the “best” of the year. NOOOO, the Hugos and the Nebulas are CLEARLY going to be a two-man race between PAT ROTHFUSS AND GEORGE RR. MARTIN, WHYYYYYYYY?

My freakout kept increasing as I read every category (again: one woman in the short story category. Is there a quota system I’m unaware of?) You can witness the results of said freakout in my post about the Hugo nominations. (Fair warning: it’s quite a long post).

I will admit, I’m the only person I know who would get this worked out about awards that haven’t even been announced yet. Such is my curse.

But for today, my friends, my curse has been lifted, because the Nebula Awards shortlist is OUT. And it is telling me that I should never, ever, ever pay attention to the Tor Reader’s Poll. Because the shortlist?

Is wearing the awesomepants.

I actually gasped when I saw the best novel category. Do you know why? Because N.K Jemisin is BACK on it, ladies and gentlemen. WHOOO HOOO!
I was convinced The Kingdom of the Gods wouldn’t make it on the ballot, because it’s the third book in the trilogy (usually not nominated in these sorts of things) and it was released in late October last year, and there wasn’t the same buzz around it there was around The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms. Which was really unfortunate, because The Kingdom of the Gods is, in my opinion, even better than The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms. It’s absolutely incredible, and I’ve been moping around because I thought it would not get the recognition it so richly deserved. But it has! Hurrah! Go N.K Jemisin!

And then, the shortlist continued its wardrobe of awesomeness by including Jo Walton’s Among Others – one of my favorite reads of the past year (and the only female-authored novel to crack the top ten in Tor’s Reader Poll). Jo Walton, or, as I like to call her: Jo “genre boundaries? What genre boundaries?” Walton.

I am fully committed to any author who writes a Victorian comedy of manners starring a pose of dragons (Tooth and Claw). Or an author who writes a story about a young witch discovering science fiction.

Of course, when I saw China Mielville’s Embassytown was on the shortlist, I knew the Nebulas were going full-out. Oh yeah. The shortlist was putting on its high heels, man. As everyone and their grandmother knows, I am slightly obsessed with China Mielville. He’s one of those hyped authors who truly deserves the hype. He also never rests on his laurels – all of his novels are different from one another, and each one of them is difficult and challenging in new ways. I always approach Mielville with a bit of trepidation because I never know if he’s going to pull it off. It’s like each one of his novels is a roller coaster, but there aren’t any tracks under the car, and Mielville’s sitting there, assuring me that yes, the roller coaster will make it back to the ground safely, and before I can protest, he locks the doors and I can’t get out. But somehow, the roller coaster DOES make it onto the ground, and I’m always amazed it hasn’t fallen out of the sky, and I can never quite figure out how he’s done it. He’s that kind of storyteller.

I was also quite pleased to see Genevieve Valentine’s Mechanique on there – I finished it last week, and I thought it was fantastic. Valentine managed to take two things I was getting a bit tired of – Steampunk and circus novels – and make them fresh and interesting by pushing the conventions to that weird, dark place I always hoped they would go to. Plus, I love a good narrative about the posthuman. I’m not sure I liked Mechanique as much as I did some other of 2011’s books, but it’s one I can get behind for the nomination.

And then I saw Kameron Hurley’s God’s War was on the ballot, and I realized that the shortlist wasn’t just wearing the awesomepants. It was wearing the diamond-incrusted, Jean-Paul Gaultier designed awesomepants.
When the ladies of the (wonderful) podcast Galactic Suburbia described God’s War, I though “There’s no way I’m not going to love this.” It’s about an assassin. There are aliens. And a holy war. And a planet settled by muslims. And people sell their wombs. And there’s BOXING. And bugs. Lots and lots and lots of bugs.

And I was right. I did love it. I’m planning on posting a full review at some point in the future, so I will restrain myself for now. But it’s a great, great book, and the fact that it was nominated for a Nebula (rather than burned to the ground for its radical feminism), gives me hope.

Sadly, I have nothing to say about Jack McDevitt’s Firebird, because… I haven’t read it. Whoops. I haven’t even really heard of it, so I will need to track it down and discover why it’s on the ballot. But given the standard of the other nominees, I’m sure it’s fantastic.

Going back to my fears that the ballot would time-travel back into the dark days of all-white men?  Incorrect! Of the best novel authors, four are women, two are men. Hurrah! The trend of women being recognized in the SF/F field continues!

As far as I know, NK Jemisin is the only author of color recognized (again, anyone with clarifications there should let me know, because I don’t want to erase anyone). But two of the novels are in a non-european setting (The Kingdom of the Gods and God’s War) and Valentine’s novel has quite a few non-white characters (I don’t know about Firebird).

I have a lot less to say about the non-novel categories, since I haven’t read that much short fiction this year (or any year, really. I’m working on it). But I let out my second gasp-whoop of the night (after N.K. Jemisin) for Ken Liu’s “The Paper Menagerie.” It’s a story that made me get teary-eyed in a public space. Enough said.

I’m also very excited to see that some of my favorite writers –  Catherynne Valente, Kij Johnson, Mary Robinette Kowal, Rachel Swirsky and Geoff Ryman – were nominated for their work in short fiction.  At some point, I’m planning on actually reading the entire short fiction ballot and writing up thoughts on it… but not until I get some more homework done.

I was a bit disappointed to see X-Men: First Class hadn’t made it onto the dramatic presentation shortlist. Because homoerotic tension should ALWAYS be rewarded with a Nebula. No, actually, unresolved homoerotic tension should be rewarded with a Nebula nomination… but then lose to a movie that actually RESOLVED the aforementioned homoerotic tension. And the Neil Gaiman-penned episode of Dr. Who, “The Doctor’s wife” got a nod, which is great, since I’m sure it will lead to Neil Gaiman doing this again (I love Neil Gaiman).

Finally, regarding the Andre Norton award for Young Adult fiction (which is… not a Nebula?I never quite understand the relationship between two, but they’re given at the same ceremony, and they’re announced at the same time).

I have only read two novels on the shortlist, but based on those two alone, I can tell you that the Andre Norton award is wearing an awesomeskirt to match the Nebula’s awesomepants. Those two books, are, of course, Nnedi Okorafor’s Akata Witch (soccer!) and Delia Sherman’s The Freedom Maze, both of which I thought were fantastic. The Freedom Maze, in particular, is an Acheivement  of a novel (capital A and all). It proves once more that YA can handle difficult and complex topics just as deftly and intelligently as “grown-up” books. If not more.
Also, the cover is amazing. I’m just saying.

all credit goes to the artist (Kathleen Jennings) the author (Delia Sherman) and the publisher (Small Beer Press)

Going back to my epic freakout over the Tor.com results, I will quickly give a gender/race breakdown of the Nebulas (again, I don’t know all of these authors, and wikipedia/image searches will only tell me so much. Correct my errors if you see them).

Novel:
4 women
2 men

1 POC (People of Color)
5 caucasian

Novella:
4 women
2 men

1 POC
6 Caucasian

Novellette:
3 women (do not be fooled by the “Charlie” in Charlie Jane Anders. I almost was (thank Claude for Wikipedia). She is, in fact, female)
4 men

7 Caucasians
0 POC

Short Story
3 women
4 men

3 POC
4 Caucasians

Andre Norton
7 women
1 man

2 POC
5 Caucasians

Hey, all in all, that’s pretty good! Maybe the Hugos and the World Fantasy awards will be a bloodbath. Maybe all the WINNERS will be white men. You never know. (It’s not paranoia if they’re really trying to kill you).

But for now, my friends, I listen to the message the Nebulas are sending me.

“Shut up, disoriented chick,” sayeth the Nebulas. “We have not yet fallen back to the dark side. We are wearing the awesomepants.  And the awesomeshirt. And the awesome high-heels. We will not go back to the drab blue jeans and T-shirt of old.”

And that’s a message I can get behind.